Thursday, January 22, 2009

What’s So Hard About Being a Writer?

“There's nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and open a vein.” -Walter Wellesley "Red" Smith

Nathan Bransford received over two hundred comments when he asked what was the hardest part of being a writer on his January 14th blog. Obviously, a lot of authors have opinions on this topic. Finding a publisher for The Ride was my most difficult task. But, with that behind me, I couldn’t narrow the hardest part down to one item. So here’s a list (in no particular order) of ten things I find hard about being a writer:

Marketing myself and my book

Finding the time to work on my next project when there is so much to be done promoting my current release

Not playing solitaire when confronted with a blank computer screen and no thoughts

Book signings with low turnouts

Talking about myself during interviews

Juggling my writing life around my ‘real’ life

Finding someone to review my book and then worrying about what they might say

Developing thick enough skin to bounce off negative comments

Being put on the spot to write something clever at a moment’s notice

Learning the technology and finding the time needed make the most out of promotion opportunities on the internet

What do you think is the most difficult aspect of being a writer?

Thanks for stopping by.


Tags: The Ride, Nathan Bransford, book signing, solitaire, marketing, Red Smith ,


2 comments:

Christina E. Rodriguez said...

You've described my sentiments exactly. There is not so much difference between writing and illustrating books, sometimes. The hard tasks are the same!

joandelahaye said...

You've pretty much managed to list all of them. I think another one, for me, is that my family just don't get it. They don't write, so they don't understand the amount of work that goes into getting a book out there and all the work that goes on once it's out. Only another writer can fully understand.

Joan De La Haye
http://joandelahaye.wordpress.com/

Jane's Ride - Novelist Jane Kennedy Sutton's journey through the ups and downs of the writing, publishing and marketing world